Takuya Saito

Takuya Saito

Graduate School of Medicine Hokkaido University
Japan

I graduated from Nippon Medical School in 1987, and in 1992 I joined Cornell Medical School, Westchester division as a visiting fellow. In 1993, I embarked on a residency training program in psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, which I completed in 1997. I was then appointed Chief Resident and was charged with supervising the psychiatry residents. Subsequently, I became a research fellow, during which time I conducted clinical research and provided patient care at the Bronx Psychiatric Center. My clinical research involved the evaluation of atypical antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia. This work was conducted as part of a wide-ranging multi-site psychopharmacology study. After completing my fellowship, I became a faculty member in the department. As a fellow, I pursued training in molecular genetics techniques and statistics. A number of important papers came out of our Program of Behavioral Genetics Program, including work on a genetic factor relating to violence in schizophrenia and ultra rapid cycling bipolar disorder. Over the years, I received research grants from the American Psychiatric Association and NARSAD that allowed me to work for the Basic Research Division in the Department of Psychiatry, where I focused particularly on identifying a genetic locus on chromosome 22q11 in multiple psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders. I also played a major role in providing psychiatric care for the Japanese community in New York by serving as a psychiatric consultant to the Japanese Consul General in New York. I also served as a consultant to the Japan Education Center to help Japanese children with mental health problems. In 2005, I returned to Nippon Medical School, Japan, where I established a child and adolescent clinic and focused on mood disorder and neurodevelopmental disorder. In 2014, I moved to Hokkaido University and started a new Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry